momochanners:

crazyintheeast:

Now that’s a muse

This is the muse that I deserve *nods*

momochanners:

crazyintheeast:

Now that’s a muse

This is the muse that I deserve *nods*

unwillingadventurer:

A plaque honouring the first producer of Doctor Who, Verity Lambert, has been unveiled at London’s Riverside studios, by theDoctor Who Appreciation Society 

The plaque, which marks the achievements of Lambert as a Film and Television producer, will be on display at Riverside Studios until the venue closes for development in the autumn, when it will be placed into storage and then permanently mounted at the new Riverside media centre when completed. 

Verity Lambert was Doctor Who’s first producer and the first female drama producer at BBC Television. She oversaw Doctor Who from her appointment in June 1963 until the autumn of 1965, guiding the series to a successful launch and laying down the framework of the series which still running today. After she left Doctor Who her credits and reputation continued to rise and she became one of the best known players in the industry. She oversaw such iconic productions as Adam Adamant Lives, Budgie, The Naked Civil Servant, Rock Follies, Rumpole of the Bailey, Edward and Mrs Simpson, Reilly: Ace of Spies, Minder, GBH and Jonathan Creek

The plaque honouring Lambert was unveiled by Doctor Who’s first director Waris Hussein, in a ceremony attended by the two surviving members of the original TARDIS team, William Russell and Carole Ann Ford. The event included a screening of the drama based on the creation of Doctor Who, An Adventure in Space and Time and a compilation of interview material, previously unseen. 

Riverside studios in Hammersmith London, were used by the BBC from 1954-1974. Although the first Doctor Who stories were recorded at the nearby Lime Grove complex, the series used Riverside Studio 1 for a number of stories between 1964 and 1969. Verity Lambert produced stories recorded at the site include The Dalek Invasion of EarthThe RescueThe RomansThe Web PlanetThe Crusade and The Chase

From Doctor Who News

"If you’re spending more time talking about writing than actually writing, you may want to reassess your priorities. I’ve seen this happen in writers’ groups, in coffeehouses, in MFA programs, in bars, on Facebook: writers who haven’t yet published anything, or who haven’t published much, talking or twittering about their “writing.” Sometimes, these people are talking or twittering about their writer’s block. Maybe it’s therapeutic to spend so much time talking about it, but I suspect it’s the opposite. I suspect it drives the supposed muse away. Take the time that you’d normally be talking about writing and write. Even if what you’re writing is crap, it’ll be more worth your while than talking about writing, because I believe you can write your way out of crappy writing, but it’s unlikely you’re going to talk your way into good writing."
John McNally (via writingquotes)

Well, this is something that I certainly need to heed, haha

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

slushpilehell:

God told me to write this book and that it would become a bestseller.

I talked to God. He said he was just fucking with you.

[x] Gates McFadden on the role of women in Star Trek (1993)

doctorwhogifs:

One of my most favorite things in the entire universe is Big Finish's Doctor Who audios. Fifteen years ago this month, they released their first Doctor Who play, and now they're celebrating with a daily deal for each year they've been in business. Today's deal (Day 2; good until Friday at 7pm BST, at which point a new sale for Day 3 begins) includes six £/$1 downloads, which means that for one pound/dollar each, you can have two hours of quality Doctor Who goodness. I want to draw attention to three of these stories, because they're among my favorite Doctor Who stories in any medium, and they can all work as introductory stories for those new to Big Finish.

  • Jubilee by Rob Shearman - Russel T Davies asked Shearman to adapt Jubilee into the Ninth Doctor episode Dalek. While it’s easy to identify the TV story’s roots in the audio, Jubilee is also a much darker, much funnier, and more fulfilling story (and I say this as someone who easily counts Dalek as among her top New Who episodes).
  • Spare Parts by Marc Platt - Spare Parts was the inspiration for the Series 2 Cyberman 2-parter, Rise of the Cybermen/The Age of Steel (if you watch the credits, you’ll see Platt’s name). Spare Parts, however, is a very different story, one RTD considers “some of the finest drama ever written for any genre, in any medium, anywhere.”
  • The Holy Terror by Rob Shearman - Oscillating between farcical and supremely creepy, this is Steven Moffat’s favorite Sixth Doctor story. (Moffat’s favorite Eighth Doctor story, The Chimes of Midnight, was also written by Rob Shearman. Basically, Sherman writes fantastic stuff.)

For a full list of today’s deals, check out Big Finish’s Day 2 news item here, and check back for new deals every day.

Even if you don’t have the money to spend on any audios right now, you can still experience Big Finish through the offerings on their SoundCloud page, one of the free downloadable features previously published with Doctor Who Magazine, or their podcasts, which include interviews, behind the scenes peeks, and occasionally even a free “taster” episode.

And if you’re mostly just disappointed that this post has no gifs, check out the series of posts I did last year about people who have worked both with Big Finish and on the new series of Doctor Who, originally done in honor of the announcement of Big Finish’s 50th Anniversary audio special, The Light at the End :D

amandapalmer:

you don’t see things 
as they are

you see things 
as you are

amandapalmer:

you don’t see things
as they are

you see things
as you are

"Have no fear, you will find your way. It’s in your bones. It’s in your soul."
Mark Z. Danielewski (via planb-becomeapirate)
Lol. Why am I not surprised? There was another ad for it just a couple scrolls down from the one I first saw. I hope this doesn’t mean I am going to be inundated with a bunch of suggestive bad porn images.

But I probably will.

Lol. Why am I not surprised? There was another ad for it just a couple scrolls down from the one I first saw. I hope this doesn’t mean I am going to be inundated with a bunch of suggestive bad porn images.

But I probably will.

I know why there are ads here. But I wish we could opt out of certain themes like trailers for horror flicks and oh yeah - 50 fucking shades of gray. Why?

"The truth is, everyone likes to look down on someone. If your favorites are all avant-garde writers who throw in Sanskrit and German, you can look down on everyone. If your favorites are all Oprah Book Club books, you can at least look down on mystery readers. Mystery readers have sci-fi readers. Sci-fi can look down on fantasy. And yes, fantasy readers have their own snobbishness. I’ll bet this, though: in a hundred years, people will be writing a lot more dissertations on Harry Potter than on John Updike. Look, Charles Dickens wrote popular fiction. Shakespeare wrote popular fiction - until he wrote his sonnets, desperate to show the literati of his day that he was real artist. Edgar Allan Poe tied himself in knots because no one realized he was a genius. The core of the problem is how we want to define “literature”. The Latin root simply means “letters”. Those letters are either delivered - they connect with an audience - or they don’t. For some, that audience is a few thousand college professors and some critics. For others, its twenty million women desperate for romance in their lives. Those connections happen because the books successfully communicate something real about the human experience. Sure, there are trashy books that do really well, but that’s because there are trashy facets of humanity. What people value in their books - and thus what they count as literature - really tells you more about them than it does about the book."

Brent Weeks (via victoriousvocabulary)

BAM

(via yeahwriters)

"Ignoring your passion is slow suicide. Never ignore what your heart pumps for. Mold your career around your lifestyle not your lifestyle around your career."
i don’t know what to do anymore (via westorientaletters)

galaxycosmos:

Trying to find motivating / aerobics videos and found this one.

Oh, hey there 80’s. Long time no see.
"If executives could do away with us, they would. If actors could do away with us, they would. And the writers that I see who are the most frustrated are the writers who cannot revel in the fact that the real pleasure of being a writer is: you’d love to get rid of me and can’t. I’m the nerd at the party. But I drove. Nobody’s getting home without my car!"
Christopher McQuarrie (x)